Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku TV Anime Staff Commentary

WAAH! Witches! Undead goth lolis! Incredibly unintimidating doggos! This year’s Halloween turned out to be magi-spooky on my blog!

Hey there, magical girls and boys! As you can see, I have once again transcended into this realm to bring you another translation work! And this time, it’s the still-not-last interview from the official Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku anime fanbook featuring all the important staff members that previously haven’t had a say. So go ahead and find out what goes on behind the scenes and how many facets there can be to the making of an anime!

Masako Itou – SD Character Designer

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Masako Itou: I worked as a key animator on “Gochuumon wa Usagi desu ka??” and director Hashimoto told me how to handle layouts and key animation, around the time the anime had finished airing, I was approached by him, inviting me to a new production: “Don’t you want to try designing SD characters for ‘MahoIku’?”
Question 02: What part gave you the most trouble?
Masako Itou: I hadn’t had any previous experience with designing SD characters, so one thing that was very hard to balance was the overall figure. maruino-san’s SD characters are very charming, so I was desperately trying to replicate what made them so endearing in the first place. Cutting down on the lines used to draw these characters compared to the actual designs while simplifying accessories and details such as ribbons while at the same time being aware of the deformation aspect and to strike a balance in intentionally dealing with magnifying and minisculing yet not trying to thwart the overall proportions, that is a very important process and I learned a lot during it. Also concerning the key animation process during the chatroom sequences, even though the characters’ heads are enlarged, if you focus too much on things like hair or shadows, you would get a design where it’s unclear whether it’s on the realistic or SD side of things and that would result in an uncanny balance, however, if you reduce the lines, you end up with something too flat… adjusting was really, really difficult.
Question 03: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Masako Itou: During the time of me creating marks to put highlights on the characters’ hair to match the characters, La Pucelle gave me constant worries. That was when director Hashimoto told me “Why don’t you just put two balls there? It’s Souta, after all!” and that pure power of imagination caught me offguard… I mean, I had nothing but feelings of gratitude. At the end of the day, La Pucelle ended up receiving the most highlighting and I don’t think anyone noticed that (probably). By the way, Magicaloid’s yen and money marks were also director Hashimoto’s idea. This attitude to not just throw away your childish side is something I want to aspire from I think.
Question 04: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Masako Itou: There are lots but in episode 03, when Top Speed hugs Ruler, I really love that. If only she and Ruler had formed a team… thinking about these what-if scenarios is fun. I feel like they get along even when they’re fighting. At the very least, *that* wouldn’t have happened if it was the two of them… I love Ruler-sama.
Question 05: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Masako Itou: There was the aspect of me being involved as part of the main staff for the first time of course, but speaking on a personal level, this became a work that I invested a great deal of thinking in. I am now a devoted fan of the ‘MahoIku’ series. I love both the story and the characters, and while I do remember the frustrations of my own shortcomings, it was also an incredibly enjoyable production. I still want to draw a lot more characters from ‘MahoIku’ so I am left with quite a strong feeling of loneliness. Should chance arise for a second season, I most certainly would like to work on it!

Hirofune Hane – Art Director

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Hirofune Hane: I have previously worked with Lerche and got addressed by its producer Higa. I had previous experience with helping out on a production of director Hashimoto, so I was entrusted with the art direction this time.
Question 02: Was there anything you were particularly conscious about when aiming to give the animated version of ‘Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku’ certain tendencies?
Hirofune Hane: The anime’s setting was a provincial town. The proto model for that was Niigata’s Joetsu City. Since we wouldn’t reproduce it entirely, we used on-location photographs as a base to construct our vision around it. As it’s an area that tends to have heavy snowfall, we added ladders to the houses used to get rid of the snow. While the actual work at no point features snowfall, I depicted it as a city that was somewhat equipped for the event of snow pouring down. The roads around the stations were also made broader with the thought in mind of leaving space to dump excessive snow there.
Question 03: What part gave you the most trouble?
Hirofune Hane: While it might be a town you can find anywhere, Koyuki’s hometown is one with both districts of an old townscape and those with newer residential areas being constructed and also the district harboring Swim Swim’s hideout, which itself is not unlike a town constructed around temples. I wanted to include all of this in the panorama that you could easily comprehend from atop the steel tower, however, that turned out to be quite complicated. Besides, there was also to consider that this might be a work with a lot of night scenes. Figuring how to handle the lightning and coloring of illumination so that viewers wouldn’t get sick of that proved to be a hurdle.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Hirofune Hane: It was fun to draw a cityscape with abandoned supermarkets, giving off the feeling of a shouwa era-esque snow country. And even though the show took place only at night, I visualized everything on my board with daylight colors.
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Hirofune Hane: I think I did a fine job with giving the VIP room in Calamity Mary’s hiding spot an outlandish feeling to its coloring. I also love the scenes with the steel tower that Koyuki attends to frequently. The steel tower might be CG but I put in a lot of details and I think it turned out cool.
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Hirofune Hane: I believe that the constructing of the art direction and main board proceeded smoothly. While Koyuki herself might be a student, for the most part, school itself is not an element in this work and there were a lot of pecularities of her as a magical girl going out at night. I remember wandering off course for the depiction of the lighting of the night sky and coloring of the clouds around episodes 04 to 06. From episode 08 onwards, the work schedule cut really close, so I remember frantically hurrying around, inserting layouts and handling backgrounds. When all was finished just about fine, that was a major relief.

Naoya Imamura – Coloring Design

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Naoya Imamura: I was asked by director Hashimoto to read the source material, to do coloring on the basics of the colors of the illustrations, and from that point onwards integrate my own outlook and before I became aware of it, I had already become part of the team – that’s what it boils down to.
Question 02: Was there anything you were particularly conscious about when aiming to give the animated version of ‘Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku’ certain tendencies?
Naoya Imamura: My line of thinking was to give the magical girls fleeting colors and to give the reality they inhabit a stable set of colors. Put practically, the lines defining the magical girls would receive a light black whereas everything else would receive a clear black, that way, I aimed to establish magical girls as something out of this world.
Question 03: What part gave you the most trouble?
Naoya Imamura: There’s a lot, take the magical phone. At first, talks came up of making the phones’ colors uniform for the entire group, but I deemed it a waste with characters this individualistic, so I exclaimed “I’ll give every character’s phone a different color!” and set myself up for the road of self-destruction. It was work that entailed visualizing the personal colors for 14 character so that was a lot to deal with. And while I’m digressing here, that’s also the reason I established indivual patterns and colors for all the characters smartphones, even though they appear only briefly.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Naoya Imamura: In the flashback scene concerning childhood Minael and Yunael in episode 10, director Hashimoto had an order for their skirt colors. “The voice actresses skirts are colored red and green, so make the colors for their skirts in this scene are red and green.” I’ve never been given an order with that kind of reasoning before.
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Naoya Imamura: The fight between Cranberry and Winterprison in episode 04. Because it feels very much like Winterprison to use magic that’s very magic-like for combat. (laughs)
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Naoya Imamura: The main characters’ colors were already settled, and since most of the scenes would play out at night, creating the basic colors was a lot of fun. Accordingly, this turned into a work where I poured a lot of my energy into other areas. Because the schedule was so tight, every section managed to finish just in time I think. Really, we did a great job.

Tomoya Mizuno – 3DCG Director

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Tomoya Mizuno: This work is this company’s project so I got an order from the top to work on it.
Question 02: Was there anything you were particularly conscious about when aiming to give the animated version of ‘Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku’ certain tendencies?
Tomoya Mizuno: This work isn’t exactly the kind of “mechas sure are cool!” project, so I put my effort into contributing the kind of quality where the CG is noncholant and doesn’t stand out much. The chatroom where all the SD characters gather was modelled by use of CG and afterwards, I put out the layout, but I think this isn’t particularly noticable from the audience’s point of view. That’s the kind of unsung hero I aimed to be.
Question 03: What part gave you the most trouble?
Tomoya Mizuno: Fav’s motions. While director Hashimoto instructed me to give him “goldfish-esque, cute-ish movements”, since Fav is almost spherical, giving him fish-like movements turned out to be a complicated endeavor and I had to redo it over and over again until I arrived at the current result. Besides, he moves so much anyway. Whenever he appears, he just moves. Within the tight schedule of a weekly anime, every day anew, I would continue to make Fav move. It’s a good memory.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Tomoya Mizuno: When I was intently modelling the steel tower, I was wondering why I was working with so many details on a steel tower and an antenna. A steel tower that I had been passing by on my way to work without ever taking notice of it suddenly had my eyes drawn to it, “So this is a terrestrial broadcast signal TV one with electromagnetic waves, huh… and that mobile-use antenna over there is for renting purposes…”, and somehow, I began to understand.
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Tomoya Mizuno: The part in the last episode where Ripple destroyed the administrator device and Fav burst apart. Up until then, I had given my best to make Fav move, so it was like I was going to distort Fav, who had become something akin to my adorable child, and tear him into pieces with my own hands and I felt complicated about that. It is my earnest wish that the audience felt cathartic at that point.
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Tomoya Mizuno: While it was my first time working as a CG director, there might have been a lot of parts that I retroactively might have handled differently, but I’m relieved I got saved in several ways and made it unharmed through it all. I think I can be proud in saying that I participated in a truly marvelous work.

Tomoyuki Kunii – Director of Photography

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Tomoyuki Kunii: It was around June in 2016 that a sempai asked me if I wanted to be involved with a magical girl anime and got invited to the project.
Question 02: Was there anything you were particularly conscious about when aiming to give the animated version of ‘Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku’ certain tendencies?
Tomoyuki Kunii: I put the images together while being aware that if you stopped everything altogether it would still look okay. With the animation and backgrounds already done, I would put big emphasis on creating an atmosphere through use of photography. I wonder if I did well in episode 03 with the chatlog, in episode 04 with Sanae’s Hanabi spot, Nana’s apartment and so on. On the other hand, the insides of busses and trains are hard to handle. Also, I put a lot of focus on making the screens of the “Magical Girl Raising Project” game that’s part of the main story look like a real life example through the images I produced. During that time, I downloaded pretty much every smartphone game for research purposes. (laughs) Also, even in case once the initial airing was done, with the corrections made to the DVD version, with changes from vertical screen to horizontal screen, I was focused on preserving consistency with what came before.
Question 03: What part gave you the most trouble?
Tomoyuki Kunii: I was quite undecided for the depicting of the chatroom, it was quite a hurdle with how many versions I gave director Hashimoto. In terms of results, an original process came out of that, so that was the result of all the worrying. Also, ever since the appearance of Hardgore Alice, the question of how much we wanted to display of the corpses not having been much of a topic lead to some trouble. Had we overdone Alice being shrouded in darkness as she gets pulverized by Calamity Mary’s gunshots in episode 07, a black mass akin to sea cucumber squirming around would have been the result.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Tomoyuki Kunii: Something that gave me a long-lasting impression was the introduction part, wherein I showed a lot to director Hashimoto, Aikei-san and Endou-san who were handling how the characters were handled and we decided one by one. “After this, these images will start moving”, is what I thought and I was brimming with excitement. Also, I only came to notice thereafter but Magicaloid is plastic-made. Also, as for the production of the Web PVs, I got to add a lot to director Hashimoto’s instructions and to play around with that. At first, it was quite a simple task to handle but before I noticed, there was quite the tremendous amounts of cuts to handle.
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Tomoyuki Kunii: It’s got to be the transformation sequences of Snow White and Ripple after all. Since these are the scenes where the magical girls get dressed, I did a lot of research on other works while minding not to get influenced too much as I created these images and I was relieved when I heard from somewhere that that was the way to go. If possible, I’d like to do the transformations of the remaining 14 magical girls (excluding Cranberry, so it’d be 13?) as well!
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Tomoyuki Kunii: Something that also plays into this is that this was my debut work on a television project as the director of photography, so I went ahead not knowing left from right but when all turned out fine and went exactly as planned, that was a big relief to me. I got to put out the best I could at the time and the content itself was also quite impactful so I believe it to have become an unforgettable work. Also, being charged with creating the atmosphere and to participate in the process of production was a lot of fun. Thank you very much!

Satoki Iida – Sound Director

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Satoki Iida: Just as usual, I received an offer from the sound creation company Music Capsule.
Question 02: Was there anything you were particularly conscious about when aiming to give the animated version of ‘Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku’ certain tendencies?
Satoki Iida: With the premise being a survival game constituting of 16 magical girls, the ranking of the casting was quite difficult as I tried to ensure that you wouldn’t be able to tell who’s going to die by assembling a cast where each of them would play their own main character, I cooperated with the main staff to achieve just that. Also, with one of this work’s charming points being that boss characters can unexpectedly be killed by weak characters, on top of ordering actors fit to voice characters such as Cranberry, The Musician of the Forest, Calamity Mary and Ruler, we aimed for a surprise effect by letting them be promptly discarded by young actors. As for the music side of things, this time around, it was constructed around teams so each respective team got its own music. Calamity Mary got a western-themed piece, and Hardgore Alice a gothic horror-themed organ track. The original concept behind creating theme music pieces was to let an imperial court theme flow in as Ruler’s theme music and after her death, whenever Swim Swim would appear, she would take over the very same music piece so we could best express her warped idea of becoming Ruler, that’s where that concept initially stemmed from. By the way, while I believe that nobody will have noticed this, whenever Ripple appears, there is no BGM. That is, in essence, Ripple’s theme BGM – “silence”.
Question 03: What part gave you the most trouble?
Satoki Iida: There were no particular hardships. Everything was fun.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Satoki Iida: There are lot of times when Minael and Yunael just move around but have no lines, and everytime that happened, Risae Matsuda-san and Satsumi Matsuda-san would previously think of ad-lib lines. Precisely because they’re twin sisters even their breathing was in perfect sync. I’ve done a great job with the casting if I say so myself. (laughs)
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Satoki Iida: Hardgore Alice, undying even as she has her head chopped off, dealing lethal damage to Magicaloid 44. There’s also the scene before with the death of La Pucelle, but this scene was really pushing the horror through and that left a deep impression on me. Not to mention that it was also a moment that added a new fighter to the story and personally, I love that. The reverse lighting enhancing her silhouette was also really beautiful.
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Satoki Iida: I for one am a big fan of horror movies so I paid a great deal of attention to not unconsciously overdoing it. (laughs) Since I can tell you that I hadn’t had any horror works to work on previously, I was overjoyed that I was selected for this kind of production. Also, I believe this to be a work where 16 people all have their own imagination of what “magical girls” are like, with the theme being the friction of these clashes of thoughts being given birth to. This isn’t just a conflict of good and evil. People have different perspectives and getting to understand each other is hard. If you could put your attention to that and draw enjoyment from it, I’d be overjoyed.

Takurou Iga – Music

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Takurou Iga: It was FlyingDog’s producer Nishibe who spoke to me. I absolutely love the magical girl genre, so I still remember being in a state of ecstasy after being addressed by him. When I read the script, I found out that there was more to it and that excited me even more.
Question 02: Was there anything you were particularly conscious about when aiming to give the animated version of ‘Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku’ certain tendencies?
Takurou Iga: Generally speaking, I specialized in making things as easy to understand as possible. The hope found in these cute magical girls’ everyday scenes and their shining futures. Also, the deformed representation of their despair and fear standing in stark contrast to that. As for the direction of all these music pieces, they are all confirmed by in exchange with only producer Nishibe. Producer Nishibe would absorb and bundle together the feedback from all the staff, including director Hashimoto, and tell me the feedback one by one, that’s how we handled it.
Question 03: What part gave you the most trouble?
Takurou Iga: There was the need to match the distortion of various different character types such as a ninja, a gunman, a princess and a sister and so forth and creating a very different kind of music for that was fun, and making these fellow pieces co-exist well, while not a hardship, was a point to be aware of. Whenever I did it, the overall feeling of these compositions would come off, so I thought of it as a weird balance.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Takurou Iga: Much like with the answer I provided for question 02, the actual music production happens in solitude, no outside events would have any impact at all. So, the events that happened within that realm were the pain that I felt when I ordered food from a restaurant that was way too unsavoury, the excitement as I went over re-editing the PV sound piece over and over again and my talking to myself increasing in numbers once my no longer having anyone to talk to got out of control. Whenever I would come to a standstill and get worried, my revisting the composition for the first PV became a supporting anchor to my heart.
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Takurou Iga: When Koyuki transforms to Snow White in the first episode, the background music is one overflowing with hope, fitting for a transformation sequence. Contrasting to that, the BGM used for Ripple transforming in episode 11 is something that wasn’t even conceptualized for that. However, that BGM fit that scene really well, representating her determination and resolution and when I watched that transformation sequence with that in mind, I really came to love it! Other scenes would include the conversation between Ripple and Top Speed in episode 11, with the emotions reaching a climax as you’re certainly moving towards the last episode and that feeling of being overall pumped up is something that I love.
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Takurou Iga: ‘MahoIku’ is overall a dark and serious work. Diving into that world and wavering, I’m genuinely glad I got to experience that. It was fun and I was overjoyed that I was invited to this production!

Muneyuki Kanbe – Chief Producer

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Muneyuki Kanbe: Since this was a project of my company, I called together the source material’s publisher Takarajimasha, the animation studio Lerche and flyingDOG as members of the production committee for the anime adaptation.
Question 02: Was there anything you were particularly conscious about when aiming to give the animated version of ‘Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku’ certain tendencies?
Muneyuki Kanbe: While the source material’s tankobon uses black as a base color for darker color tones, as for the anime, one might also argue that there’s a connotation for imagery to exhibit charme and it was during the production planning stage that I became aware of my desire to express brighter colors and portray the cuteness of the characters. As the animation production made progress, my point of view became to let director Hashimoto and producer Kitamura handle it all. At the end of the day, I think it became a wonderful work of art.
Question 03: What part gave you the most trouble?
Muneyuki Kanbe: Magical girls are beings who link the components of fantasy and girls (although there are several characters that fit neither criteria) and their stories are those linking that to their various everyday lifes and that’s why with scenes with these magical girls dropping out one after another, we couldn’t just simply depict these moments just like that, however, digging too deeply into their lifes would also be difficult and that part was an issue. I believe that the series composer Yoshioka-san and director Hashimoto did a marvelous job in finding the right balance.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Muneyuki Kanbe: I didn’t really enter the production side for this work all too often, however, when it comes to the dubbing – voice recording – side, I do have an impression. I saw the joy in veterans such as Ogata Megumi-san and Inoue Kikuko-san performing alongside the young actresses and that’s when I thought “This production sure is going well.”
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Muneyuki Kanbe: All of the scenes where Snow White stands on building’s rooftops or the steel tower have left an impression on me. As long as the place construction remains the same, from her overflowing with hope after having just become a magical girl (such as La Pucelle’s outburst-esque confession and so forth), to her expressing more and more a face filled with struggles and suffering as the episodes progress and finally, in the last episode, as her facial expression brims with resolution, no matter which situation she is placed in, she expresses these feelings frankly and I, for one, thought that was great. Also, the scene in the last episode where Snow White and Ripple converse on top of the steel tower, I love the part where Ripple’s face is seen in side profile with the cut on her face not looking unlike a tear (although I’m not sure if that was director Hashimoto’s intention).
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Muneyuki Kanbe: If I were to put it short, I’d say it was a marvelous work. From young creators such as the novelist Asari Endou-sensei and maruino-san diligently explaining settings and character portrayal not found in the source material to everyone in the staff and cast, I can’t help but feel that they’ve marched towards a goal in the right direction. I hope to create something once again with these members.

Emi Kashimura – Producer

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Emi Kashimura: With concern to the studio and the adaptation production, I was mainly in charge of the PR. From the business side, Chief Producer Kanbe-san was in charge, whereas when it comes to the production staff and the side of getting the product realized, as well as being the promotion producer, I focused on thinking how I should promote the work and focused on the side of advertising.
Question 02: What do you think is the most charming point of this work?
Emi Kashimura: How it has this cruel, very far removed from the general image of magical girls depiction and the suspenseful twists. On one hand, the character design is very imaculate and has this cute vibe going for it. I believe this unbalance to be one of the points of appeal behind the source material. In the anime, we gave the portrayal of these various magical girls’ inner feelings an additional edge, and I believe that adds more dramatic components and charme to it.
Question 03: When putting together the planning for this work and to raise the quality of it, what was something that you particularly paid heed to?
Emi Kashimura: Even though I have said the very same thing in the interview in the booklet for the third volume of the BD and DVD… the struggle and desperate measures as a result of being chased by extreme conditions, the desperation to stay alive as you’re being subjected to life and death situations, with normal encounters being the only thing that doesn’t exist in this story, I believed there to be sense of beauty in that. This death match of magical girls with a pure, undiluted feeling of not wanting to die and the concept of cruelty erupting precisely because of these pure feelings, that is something that became enticing to the people working on this project and that’s why depicting that with no shortcuts and no way out was what I put all my heart into.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Emi Kashimura: Right when the script meeting began (or around that time…), people began joking “Who’s Kitamura?” and started calling me “leader”… “leader”, that’s the nickname that ended up sticking to me. Even though I told them that I didn’t like that, they sure kept calling me “leader” up until the very end… I do feel it’s because they’re fond of me though… (laughs)
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Emi Kashimura:That was in the B part half of episode 01 on the rooftops, the scene with Snow White and La Pucelle having a conversation. La Pucelle is swinging her tail around all frilly and that was really cute, watching Snow White as she’s saying “Even though magical girls have to be pure, just and beautiful!”, La Pucelle’s eyes narrow and she smiles and that was a truly adorable scene that I absolutely loved. In episode 5’s B part, on the rooftop with the moon in the background, the cut where Snow White and La Pucelle are sitting with their backs facing each other, I loved the feeling of youth expressed through the bittersweetness of puberty that gave off. It’s unbelievable that right thereafter things would turn out like that… even though I knew beforehand, personally, it was still a heartwrenching scene.
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Emi Kashimura: It just so happened to be the case that as a producer, this was my first work to be in charge of, so I was utterly desperate as there were so many things I didn’t know of. However, in times of trouble, my many sempais gave me words of advice, and watched over me or rather, there was this strong sense at the scene of me being raised properly. Thank you very much. Amongst all of these, it is of course everyone from the production staff to whom massive gratitude goes towards. They brought us such a marvelous work to the screens. I’m grateful from the bottom of my heart. From the time of me picking up the source material to completing the anime, roughly two years had passed. An anime being produced sure is the work of so many people cooperating and making it happen, that’s a realization I had once more. Towards all the staff and director Hashimoto and furthermore the cast who drew out additional appeal from the characters and everyone who partook in the project, really, thank you very much!

Takeshi Minami – Producer

Question 01:Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Takeshi Minami: I am the contact person for the co-production with Videomaker. As for the “production” side, I assist the leader of GENCO, which is the organizer for the co-production and under that title I do the very simple work of showing my face at the scriptwriter meetings, the dubbing, the sound production site, also known as “MA” [TL note: “Multiplex Audio”] and the on-air delivery material’s video compilation site, asking the staff under director Hashimoto “And? How is it going?”. When it comes to business inside the company, as the person in charge of the production with the video software, I planned and organized the Blu-ray Disc & DVD to have four volumes with three episodes each. With the booklet, I’m a bit too enthusiastic and I regret that somewhat.
Question 02: What do you think is the most charming point of this work?
Takeshi Minami: This hasn’t at all changed since I first was addressed by GENCO and picked up the source material to read it but I think it’s the “parts that are malicious and unfriendly”. The cuter the magical girls are in appearance, the clearer their pre-transformation everydays and personalities become, all humans hold their own dark desires and complexes and these are brought to the forefront, and then they die without losing their intended glamour, just like that. It’s common for characters who appear in fiction to have personalities and behavior patterns deformed from actual human beings, however, with a deformation that has a tendency to be “malicious”, to both the characters and the audience, that is “unfriendly”. That’s the kind of stuff that I love.
Question 03: When putting together the planning for this work and to raise the quality of it, what was something that you particularly paid heed to?
Takeshi Minami: By the time I entered the project, the planning stage of the production had already concluded, so I will instead write about what I minded when it comes to increasing the quality, but generally speaking, I redid the production work from GENCO, so with that said, I occasionally checked out the sites in question and consulted with the staff and cast and softened the mood, at least that’s how I myself remember it.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Takeshi Minami: I think it happened in the midst of a script meeting when Yoshioka-san said “Director Hashimoto, let us, too, create a production technique called ‘If you say ‘Hashimoto Hiroyuki’, then this is what it’s all about!’. Let’s call it the ‘HASHIMOTO’.” and while there was no explanation on what kind of production technique this was about, at every given instance, there were statements like “For this scene, one HASHIMOTO please.” and I thought that was really interesting. It’s a sensibility similar to the Kaneda Perspective or Itano Circus.
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Takeshi Minami: It’s a part that’s similar to what I’ve described in my response to the second question, namely the in episode 10’s A part, the date scene with Snow White and Hardgore Alice at the beach at night. While Alice constantly overshowers Snow White with admiration and love, just when Snow White who had lost La Pucelle and begun to try relying on Alice, Snow White reacts in stark shock to the message she has received from Fav and she rejects Alice by pushing her back. There are only few anime that portray the weakness inside people’s hearts this accurately, that’s what I thought. For the same reason, in episode 07’s B part right at the beginning, I also love the scene from Kano’s past at her middle school’s girls toilet.
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Takeshi Minami: It was fun. This was one of the rare projects where I wasn’t the one who initiates everything so I was slightly more relaxed and by following what everyone else was working on, I also got to learn a lot. I applaud director Hashimoto and the staff and cast below him who engrained the themes of “cuteness”, “cruelty” and also “foolishness” into this story and these characters.

Yuuji Higa – Animation Producer

Question 01: Please tell us the specifics about how you got involved with this work.
Yuuji Higa: I am an animation producer so that’s how I’m affiliated.
Question 02: What do you think is the most charming point of this work?
Yuuji Higa: Personally, I like that while this is a magical girl battle royale story, it’s not just about battles but there’s also elements of suspense in it.
Question 03: When putting together the planning for this work and to raise the quality of it, what was something that you particularly paid heed to?
Yuuji Higa: When putting together the anime adaptation of “Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku”, what I focused on was choosing the main staff. Director Hashimoto, Aikei-san, Yoshioka-san, there were a lot of people who were first brought together at Lerche, however, I believe to have brought together wonderful staff members all focused on “Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku”.
Question 04: Please tell us about an event during production that left a deep impression on you.
Yuuji Higa: Going out to scout places for material gathering since that would become the stage, these memories became valuable too and I found it enjoyable that what we brought to screen had a realistic touch to it.
Question 05: Please tell us about which scene from the anime you personally liked the most and why.
Yuuji Higa: When Fav got destroyed. All these feelings that were wallowing inside myself finally got released and that was an unbelievably refreshing experience. (laughs)
Question 06: Please tell us about your thoughts when reflecting upon the production of this work.
Yuuji Higa: Including director Hashimoto, the staff at the scene, through sticking together and passion, created a really good work, that’s what I think. The source material is still going on, so I would once again with these staff members like to aim at a “Mahou Shoujo Ikusei Keikaku” restart.

And once more, you have reached the end on your quest of knowledge! But for those of you who didn’t know yet, there is a lot more to find out on this magi-extensive journey as I’ve translated plenty of other interviews and comments before!

That might be all Zaku translations for now but there’s some more Zaku opinion pieces out there:

Can you see the light ahead? Maybe not because you’ve got too many text walls ahead of you, pon!

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